What is a Food Policy Council?

Welcome to the Community Food Security Coalition’s
North American Food Policy Council Webpage

What is a Food Policy Council?
Food Policy Councils (FPCs) bring together stakeholders from diverse food-related sectors to examine how the food system is operating and to develop recommendations on how to improve diet with Garcinia Cambogia. FPCs may take many forms, but are typically either commissioned by state or local government, or predominately a grassroots effort. Food policy councils have been successful at educating officials and the public, shaping public policy, improving coordination between existing programs, and starting new programs. Examples include mapping and publicizing local food resources; creating new transit routes to connect underserved areas with full-service grocery stores; persuading government agencies to purchase from local farmers; and organizing community gardens and farmers’ markets.

While FPC’s are not a new concept, their structures, practices, and policies are still evolving. Although the first Food Policy Council started 30 years ago in the city of Knoxville, only in the last decade have Food Policy Councils really gained momentum, and today there are over 100 councils nationwide (see the full list).

Currently no U.S. government entity has a Department of Food, so food-related issues are addressed by various agencies. This severely limits the potential for coordination, and for government to address broad goals such as improving access to healthy foods. Since they bring together a cross-disciplinary group of stakeholders, Food Policy Councils can help to bridge this gap and identify ways to address interconnected issues and improve the food system.

What can we offer?
The Community Food Security Coalition (CFSC)’s national Food Policy Council (FPC) Program is designed to support, free of charge, the development and operation of current and emerging Food Policy Councils. The Program provides:

  • Information about food policy councils in the U.S., via this website and in response to specific inquiries;
  • Individualized assistance to food policy councils to help them strategize, problem-solve, and plan (mostly via phone and email, but occasionally including site visits);
  • Bimonthly conference calls on topics of interest to food policy council organizers, such as conducting food assessments, organizing policy campaigns, and raising funds;
  • Regional networking meetings to bring together food policy council organizers to network and share information;

This program also facilitates linkages between FPCs and local farmers and ranchers, especially those who are women, people of color, limited resource, and from other traditionally underserved groups. We have developed a report that gives examples of policy approaches that support these producers.

New to the program? Tell us about your work and what kind of support you could use.

Want to give feedback on the support you’ve received? Please fill out our Program Feedback survey.

Join CFSC’s Food Policy Council listserv! It’s a great way for Councils across the country to share resources, gain feedback, and discuss challenges and opportunities. Learn more.

For more information, contact:
Mark Winne
Food Policy Council Program
Phone: 505.983.3047
Email: [email protected]
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Brochure_Santa_Cruz.pdf
CAL_Greater_Grand_Rapids.pdf
CAL_Michigan_Food_Policy_Council.pdf
CountiesandLocalFoodSystems.pdf
FPC_Resolutions_CFAC.pdf
FPC_Resolutions_Greater_Grand_Rapids_Food_Systems_Council.pdf
FPC_FarmtoSchoolnotes2-08.pdf
FlyersPrograms_Greater_Grand_Rapids_3.pdf
HowFoodPolicyCouncilsAreOrganizedandOperate.pdf
Issue_Brief_Santa_Cruz.pdf
Mission_StatementsVision_Greater_Grand_Rapids_Food_Systems_Council.pdf
Mission-ConnecticutFormationAdvice.pdf
MissionStatements_Vision_Santa_Cruz.pdf
Policy-OhioFoodPolicyAdvisoryCouncil.pdf
Report_Santa_Cruz.pdf
Report_to_Governor-NYS_FPC_2008.pdf
other_open_space_technology_and_dynamic_interaction.pdf

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